Moreton Bay Region Student Wins $2K Environment Bursary

Graduate Pine Rivers State High School student and captain, Brodie Crouch has been awarded the 2019 Don Perrin Bursary of $2,000, to help him find a solution to protect the planet’s environment.

The University of Queensland student said his overall goal for the future is to help find the right ‘balance’ between human needs and the environment, in a realistic and practical way.

“I feel honoured to receive the Don Perrin Bursary for 2019 and wish to sincerely thank Moreton Bay Regional Council for the assistance and recognition that this grant brings,” Brodie said in a statement (watch the video above).

“It will ease the financial burden associated with full-time study, particularly helping with the daily commutes to the St Lucia campus from our glorious region.”

Moreton Bay Region Councillor, Adrian Raedel explained the importance of the bursary programme, which awarded Brodie $2,000.

“This one in particular, it does show that the Moreton Bay region is made up of very diverse environments,” Cr Raedel said in the video above.

“This one in particular allows us as a council and as a community to support people like Brodie, who are passionate about their environment, about our environment, to do what they love to do.

“Brodie will get to go through university, become a great person in his own right, and go out there and help get the balance of environment vs people vs cars vs development, and help drive that around the Moreton Bay region.”

The Don Perrin Environmental Bursary assists first-year uni students with education expenses, and is named after local resident, the late Don Perrin who was instrumental in the establishment of the region’s Redcliffe Botanic Gardens.

Press Release

Mount Mee enviro student scoops $2000K

Mount Mee resident Brodie Crouch has scored a $2000 study grant from Moreton Bay Regional Council to help him achieve his goal of finding solutions to protecting the planet’s environment.

The former Pine Rivers State High School student and school captain was announced winner of the Don Perrin Bursary at council’s coordination committee meeting on Tuesday, 28 May.

The Don Perrin Environmental Bursary, which assists first-year uni students with education expenses, was named after local resident Don Perrin who was instrumental in the establishment of the region’s Redcliffe Botanic Gardens.

Council’s Lifestyle and Amenity Spokesperson, Councillor Denise Sims, congratulated Brodie and said she was thoroughly impressed with the steps the 17-year-old was taking towards achieving his aspirations.

“Throughout the application process, Brodie has demonstrated a strong commitment to the environment and is now well on his way to achieving his Bachelor of Advanced Science at the University of Queensland,” Cr Sims said.

“It’s terrific to see Brodie working hard to find answers to some of the world’s greatest environmental challenges.”

Brodie’s local representative Division 12 Councillor Adrian Raedel applauded him for his extra-curricular work and volunteering.

“I have no doubt Brodie will make an excellent environmental ambassador and role model in our region,” he said.

“Beyond his school and tertiary studies, Brodie has also participated in Landcare activities in Mount Mee and the Boeing Future Environmental Leaders Program 2016 as well as many environmental initiatives at school including waste management and fundraising to support local and international causes.”

Brodie said the Don Perrin Bursary and would put him in good stead for a career in environmental management.

“In studying for my degree, I have chosen a Geographical Science major with an Ecology minor. I aim to use these qualifications to acquire a job in research and problem solving, particularly around the issues of land use and development, water management, global warming and agriculture,” Brodie said.

“My overall goal for the future is to help find the right ‘balance’ between human needs and the environment, in a realistic and practical way.

“I feel honoured to receive the Don Perrin Bursary for 2019 and wish to sincerely thank Moreton Bay Regional Council for the assistance and recognition that this grant brings. It will ease the financial burden associated with full-time study, particularly helping with the daily commutes to the St Lucia campus from our glorious region.”

Transcript

Speaker 1: I’m here with Brodie. Now, Brodie’s the winner of the Don Perrin Award. The Don Perrin Environmental Award is a bursary of $2000. It was first done in 2010, it was decided in 2007. Unfortunately Don passed away in 2017, but his legacy lives on with this award.
Brodie, you’re here, you’re a Mount Mee resident.

Brodie: Yes.

Speaker 1: Went to Pine Rivers State High School, and is the winner. So there were four recipients and you, congratulations.

Brodie: Cheers.

Speaker 1: Well done.

Brodie: Thank you very much for that.

Speaker 1: There’s your certificate, and the cheque is in the mail mate.

Brodie: Yes.

Speaker 1: No, we handed that over earlier, so you’ve got that. It’s over with Mum for safe keeping.

Brodie: Great.

Speaker 1: Now, you study at Saint Lucia?

Brodie: Yep, university of Queensland, yeah.

Speaker 1: What are you studying, tell me because it’s a mouth full isn’t it?

Brodie: Yeah so a bachelor in advanced science, and majoring in geographical science, and then I’ve got a minor in ecology. So the whole aim of that was to try and get humans in the environment that kind of finding the right balance, and then being able to make those decisions with a ecology background for the best outcomes I guess, in terms of the different management strategies.

Speaker 1: So a part of leading into this winning the bursary, you’ve done some environmental stuff. You’ve done some of it through the pine rivers high school, so can you tell us a little bit about that?

Brodie: So I was involved in a future environmental leaders programme. We were trying to reduce our school’s ecology footprint, and to do that we had a issue with our bins, they were terrible. Letting rubbish out all the time. We went and bought new wheelie bins. We pitched to Boeing to try and secure some funding, because Boeing were really interesting with helping out these different schools involved with the programme. Then from there we installed the new bins and we made a bin enclosure for one of them so that they would be secure and there was a lot of work we had to do with fire hazards, that kind of thing with the wheelie bins. We went through that and are now trialling a recycling programme that we started up using some fundraising for skips in our location.

Speaker 1: You come from a dairy background of Mount Mee.

Brodie: Yeah.

Speaker 1: You’re the third generation there actually up there milking the cows, because I know you still get up there and do some milking of the cows. Crazy times in the morning. Why is the environment so important from your background, being a farming backer.

Brodie: The thing about the dairy is that we were really trying to manage it in the best way that we keep the cows happy. You don’t want a monoculture area that the cows are living in for their best production. It was all about our riparian zones, managing them properly, revegetating those areas, and really trying to stimulate the best biodiversity outcomes because of all the different ecosystem functions and benefits you get off them.

Speaker 1: Very good. You get up you help the whole family with… So what time do you get up in the morning?

Brodie: About 5 o’clock.

Speaker 1: You’re absolutely nuts. In Mount Mee it’s freezing cold so well done. You travel each day, you live in Mount Mee, but you get to stay in Samford I think you were telling me, but you still travel down to Saint Lucia. So when you’re travelling from Mount Mee though how many hours to Saint Lucia?

Brodie: About two hours into the campus.

Speaker 1: Public Transport?

Brodie: Public transport from Petrie.

Speaker 1: How will the bursary help you?

Brodie: In so many ways, there’s the cost of the diesel and the go karts to get down to uni in the first place. Paying for the degree, and then maybe later on down the track looking at allocating some of that to paying board or something like that to maybe get a bit closer to the uni to try and cut down some of the transport.

Speaker 1: So it’s about two hours travel if you’re heading from Mount Mee, isn’t it?

Brodie: Yeah, that’s right.

Speaker 1: A bit of a hike.

Brodie: Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1: Very good. I guess I’m going-

Speaker 3: I’ve got a couple of quick questions Brodie. The benefit of back to the Moreton Bay region, getting a bursary from the council, do you see yourself putting back into the Moreton Bay region? Or what might that look like?

Brodie: Oh yeah for sure, definitely. I was really interested in getting involved in the research, and problem solving. Later down the track I really would be wanting to look at the best ways to manage and get the best outcomes for humans and environments, but also yeah it comes for the environment, and finding a balance there. In the Moreton Bay region I see that as being really important, we’ve got all the different eco systems in
Moreton Bay: the wetlands, and the migratory birds systems and that kind of thing. I think that by finding that right balance that’s something I’d really love to be involved in.

Speaker 3: Growing up in the Moreton Bay region, and having a background in farming, how did you come to be interested in the environment and what age was that?

Brodie: Really early on because mum and dad would take us bush walking and that kind of thing. Just being out involved in the environment really is probably what started it for me. At home with the farm we’ve got wallabies, and we’ve got platypus in the damn, and that kind of thing. Just seeing that and being involved with it was… Well really want to keep that around for the future.

Speaker 3: They knew university there’s been a lot of discussion about that in the Moreton Bay region, what does that mean to you? You’re coming up through you’ve got interest in the environment you’re having to go outside the region to do the courses that you’re doing now. How important do you think that university is to the future of the Moreton Bay region

Brodie: Essential really. The research that’s going on there at the moment, and then the way that that research can then inform new policy making, and like I said the environmental decision making that we decide to make. It is really critical. If we’ve got the best knowledge we have about different ecosystems and different interactions between humans then we’re in the best position to make well informed decisions of how to find that right balance I guess.

Speaker 3: How much would it change your day not needing to make your way down Saint Lucia, but maybe being able to attend the university in the Moreton Bay region for the same courses that you’re doing now?

Brodie: It would definitely be beneficial just being a bit closer to home, for sure. Yeah.

Speaker 3: Through this process it sounds like there was a panel that came together to give consideration, what was it that put Brodie over the edge as far as being the winner?

Speaker 1: Brodie has a passion for the environment. He’s gone through and done a number of different programmes like we had with the Boeing environmental programme. He’s definitely a passionate person about the environment. He’s a great ambassador for the Moreton Bay region, going to UQ, going to other locations and letting people know what we do here in Moreton Bay. Showcasing the fact that we have these very passionate environmental people here in Moreton Bay.

Speaker 3: Why are the bursary’s important for the Moreton Bay region as a council to get behind?

Speaker 1: This one in particular, it does show that the Moreton Bay region is made up of very diverse environments. This one in particular allows us as a council and as a community to support people like Brodie, who are passionate about their environment, about our environment, to do what they love to do. Brodie will get to go through university, become a great person in his own right, and go out there and help get the balance of environment vs people vs cars vs development, and help drive that around the Moreton Bay region.

Speaker 3: Brodie this is your opportunity, you’ve got the camera, you can take this opportunity to encourage people to look into the environment, that consideration that you would maybe want the community to give to the environment. If you want to also talk about this award and maybe other people going through that application process, and the benefits there might be.

Speaker 1: Yeah, for sure. At the end of the day when I applied for the Don Perrin Award, it’s not a whole heap of your time. You fill out application form and then the benefits you get down the track are incredible. In terms of encouraging people to go for it, if you’ve got that passion and that drive, if you can get that on paper and really make that come across, then I think it’s worth all your time. The other thing with encouraging people to take steps in the environment, I would say that its the little things that count at the moment. You don’t have to go out there and make radical changes, but just getting behind the recycling programme, your local recycling programme. Maybe getting out into these national environments a bit more and coming to appreciate them, and making sure that you’re and informed citizen, a global citizen. You know what your impacts are having on certain different environments.

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